Ray Charles, KOL and Adolph Linden’s record company

Adolph LindenIt was after serving four years during WWII, that Seattle’s former big jazz impresario, Norm Bobrow, came home and was soon heard over the Queen Anne Hill-based KRSC station doing a 15-minute weekly news-commentary radio show, and seen back on the nightclub scene reconnecting with old pals including the popular pianist/band-leader Gay Jones.

By early 1946 Bobrow met up with Adolph Linden [KJR – The Northwest Radio Service] and they agreed to make a record together. By that time Linden’s son Jimmy (1914-1972) was working as an audio engineer over at the KOL radio studios in the basement of the Northern Life Towers (1220 3rd Avenue) and a session was booked there. The result became Linden Record Company’s commercial debut — and perhaps the first locally recorded, locally issued, popular jazz record: a 78 rpm single featuring two Irving Berlin songs “The Dark Town Strutter’s Ball” and “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” as performed by Jones’ Orchestra with vocals by Bobrow.

But it was another historically significant early Seattle record — Ray Charles’s 1949 debut disc “Confession Blues” – that holds out a possible connection to the Linden family tale. What little is known about the circumstances surrounding that record is this: Charles and his trio (who were hosts of a weekly KRSC radio show where they advertised their upcoming nightclub gigs) were discovered in town by a traveling Los Angeles-based music exec. A deal was struck and, according to Charles’s autobiography, they proceeded to “a little recording studio in Seattle.” It is the exact name of that studio that has remained a puzzle all these years — but it seems quite likely, given the paucity of studios existing at the time, that Charles’s session took place at KOL with Jimmy Linden participating. - HistoryLink.org SEARCH: Adolph Linden
Search: Northwest Radio Service

(((( OTR )))) Bob & Ray – Wally Ballou & the Lady Blacksmith; Mr. Science & Jimmy Secret Decoder

Bob & Ray’s 40-year career began at WHDH, Boston. Bob was a disc jockey, and Ray a newscaster. When the Red Sox games were delayed on account of rain, they began to amuse each other to fill the time. Soon they had a daily show of their own, “Matinee with Bob & Ray,” an improvised, madcap exercise in controlled chaos. Over their long career, they created more than a hundred characters, all played by Bob or Ray. Wally Ballou, the hapless journalist, Mary McGoon, whose recipe for frozen ginger ale salad prefigures Martha Stewart; Biff Burns in the sports room, Webley Webster, Barry Campbell, a third rate actor with an ego the size of the universe, Mary Backstayge, Noble Wife whose pals travel the world in search of goofy adventure.

Their humor is subtle, dry, intelligent and clean. Bob & Ray have a keen ear for language, how it is used and misused by the con artists, hucksters and hustlers who populate radio and television. Their humor is timeless. Bob & Ray‘s satire of soap operas, game shows, radio shrinks and other self-appointed “experts,” and commercials, is as pertinent today as it was in 1946. They belong in the pantheon of American humor, alongside Mark Twain, George Ade, Will Rogers, and S. J. Pearlman.

In 1951 NBC brought them to New York for a daily 15-minute television program, and numerous radio shows. Over the next thirty years they appeared on every major network, and on three powerful New York stations. They finished their radio career on public radio with the “The Bob & Ray Public Radio Show” (1982-2004), and a farewell appearance at Carnegie Hall (1984).

Bob & Ray – Wally Ballou & the Lady Blacksmith; Mr. Science & Jimmy Secret Decoder

Twice the fun today with Bob & Ray. First, Wally Ballou interviews a lady blacksmith, only to be interrupted by a reporter from a competing network. Then, Mr. Science explains to Jimmy how to use lemons to send secret messages…

Brandmeier premieres on KLAY

Westwood One will syndicate the Jonathan Brandmeier Show from flagship station WLS/Chicago, beginning March 30. The program will be heard live on 1180 KLAY in Lakewood/Tacoma. Brandmeier replaces Dennis Miller and the morning placement gives KLAY the advantage of airing the program direct, rather than delaying it, as many syndicated programs have been. Whether listeners will take to the Chicago personality is to be determined.Clark Howard will be heard in Miller’s afternoon timeslot. Dropped from the 1180 lineup – Herman Caine.

JonB

(((( OTR )))) Bob & Ray – Grand Motel

Bob & Ray’s 40-year career began at WHDH, Boston. Bob was a disc jockey, and Ray a newscaster. When the Red Sox games were delayed on account of rain, they began to amuse each other to fill the time. Soon they had a daily show of their own, “Matinee with Bob & Ray,” an improvised, madcap exercise in controlled chaos. Over their long career, they created more than a hundred characters, all played by Bob or Ray. Wally Ballou, the hapless journalist, Mary McGoon, whose recipe for frozen ginger ale salad prefigures Martha Stewart; Biff Burns in the sports room, Webley Webster, Barry Campbell, a third rate actor with an ego the size of the universe, Mary Backstayge, Noble Wife whose pals travel the world in search of goofy adventure.

Their humor is subtle, dry, intelligent and clean. Bob & Ray have a keen ear for language, how it is used and misused by the con artists, hucksters and hustlers who populate radio and television. Their humor is timeless. Bob & Ray‘s satire of soap operas, game shows, radio shrinks and other self-appointed “experts,” and commercials, is as pertinent today as it was in 1946. They belong in the pantheon of American humor, alongside Mark Twain, George Ade, Will Rogers, and S. J. Pearlman.

In 1951 NBC brought them to New York for a daily 15-minute television program, and numerous radio shows. Over the next thirty years they appeared on every major network, and on three powerful New York stations. They finished their radio career on public radio with the “The Bob & Ray Public Radio Show” (1982-2004), and a farewell appearance at Carnegie Hall (1984).

Bob & Ray – Grand Motel – Continental Breakfast

In this dramatization, The Grand Motel has fallen on hard times. Plans are underway to get business through advertisement on matchbook covers. But, in the meantime, customers continue to turn away from… Grand Motel.

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