Radio bits and pieces

Country KAYO has a wild contest going on in which the station will bestow a “hoof in mouth award” to the public official of this state who most richly deserves the honor. Listeners are asked to submit nominations on a postcard. The winner gets alive calf, along with a plaque.

KETO 1590 begins it’s nightly “legislative report” from the radio gallery of the state capital at 10 tonight. – January 9, 1967 - CJ Skreen – Seattle Times

[Ad and radio highlights  from May 1964]

Charles Herring, former video news director for KING  TV, will return to channel 5 July 5 to assume duties as supervisor of both radio and television news. This news was announced yesterday by Otto Brandt, vice president and general manager of KING, along with the information that KING Broadcasting Company soon will combine its KING TV and Radio KING new staffs into one operation.

Herring, who has been affiliated with the new staff of KNXT-TV Los Angeles for the past few months, will take the post of news director for KING Broadcasting Company.

Richard Ross will act as associate news director for the combined operation Tom Franklin, Geoffrey Harwood and Bob Ryan will continue in their respective positions

June 3, 1954 – Glenna M. Lowes – Seattle Times

 

[KAYO Kashbox contest 1954]

 

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KAYO started a high-low money giveaway promotion this week. It was so swamped with calls that Ma Bell asked John DiMeo to call off the contest since it was jamming the phone system. Well, Ma, promotions like that cost a lot of money, so DiMeo and PNB reached agreement on a new phone number, new exchange. Ring high, ring low, KAYO. —  Walt Evans, 1967 – Seattle Times

 

Concerto & Custards

The Teamsters Union sponsored a concert series on 770 KXA in 1956 called, An Hour with Katims. The program was introduced and included program notes by Milt Katims, conductor of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. The program was heard every Sunday.

Weekdays, KOMO 1000 featured Lunch with Katherine Wise. Ruth Fratt was her real name. She started offering recipes and household hints on KOMO radio in 1952, and continued into the 1970s when she retired. She died in 1995 at the age of 88.

On the subject of TV cooking shows, “KING’s Queen” Bea Donovan started her show on the young KING 5 in February 1950. The show premiered at 7pm. During the mid-1940s, she demonstrated home appliances at the Bon Marche. She also had a daily afternoon cooking show there. Bea Donovan also retired in the 1970s. She died in 1999 at the age of 91.